Welcome to the Wordsworth and Romanticism Blog. Here you will find lively and engaging explorations of the literature, history and culture of the Romantic period (1750 to 1850) from a variety of contributors. Illuminating and thought-provoking, they offer fresh perspectives on a period in our cultural history that continues to fascinate and inspire.

Michael McGregor  – The Robert Woof Director of The Wordsworth Trust

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William Godwin painted by James Northcote in 1802, when Mary was just turning five. National Portrait Gallery, London.William Godwin painted by James Northcote in 1802, when Mary was just turning five. National Portrait Gallery, London.

Coleridge and Godwin: A literary friendship

by Pamela Clemit

‘No two persons can be conceived more opposite in character or genius than [Coleridge and Godwin]’, wrote Hazlitt in The Spirit of the Age (1825). He placed them side-by-side in his ‘Gallery of Contemporary Portraits’, as if to intensify each by the proximity of the other. In person and on paper, their […]

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge
William Godwin
Wordsworth and Romanticism

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John Thelwall, attrib to John Hazlitt. Owned by the National Portrait Gallery and on show at Dove CottageJohn Thelwall, attrib to John Hazlitt. Owned by the National Portrait Gallery and on show at Dove Cottage

John Thelwall and the idea of democracy

by Geoffrey Bindman

John Thelwall (1764-1834), was a friend of both Wordsworth and Coleridge, and one of the most radical political activists of his day. That radicalism was stimulated by his knowledge of English history and wide reading in philosophy and literature. He claimed to have been inspired by the prominent campaigner for political reform, […]

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The intellectual context of Romanticism
Wordsworth and Romanticism

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cave

Wordsworthian Romance: 'Into a dazzling cavern'

This post is a shortened version of the Jonathan Wordsworth Memorial Lecture given by Professor Frederick Burwick, at  Grasmere on February 21st 2015.  You can see a film of the whole talk below.

 

In the eighteenth century, the term ‘Romantic’ was applied to a literary resurgence of wild narratives similar to those popular in the aristocratic circles of […]

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The Wordsworth Trust
William Wordsworth
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Lord Byron's Dog 'Lyon' (The Wolf Dog) 
by Clifton Tomson. Image courtesy of Newstead AbbeyLord Byron's Dog 'Lyon' (The Wolf Dog) by Clifton Tomson. Image courtesy of Newstead Abbey

Bears, badgers and Boatswain: Lord Byron and his animals

By Tiffany Francis

I remember discussing Byron with my fellow undergrads in the Students’ Union one morning; we were immersed in a module on Romanticism, and had just retired from a lecture on Don Juan. Several coffees later, we had arrived at two conclusions. Firstly, we were desperately in love with him; secondly, we were […]

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William Wordsworth by Henry Eldridge c.1807William Wordsworth by Henry Eldridge c.1806. The Wordsworth Trust.

245 years on, Wordsworth still has much to teach us

By Jonathan Kerr

On the eve of William Wordsworth’s 245th birthday – an occasion celebrated by bibliophiles worldwide each April 7th – some of Britain’s finest contemporary poets are engaged in a project they call The New Lyrical Ballads. This collection pays homage to The Lyrical Ballads (1798), the book of poems Wordsworth co-authored with […]

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William Wordsworth
Wordsworth and Romanticism

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