Welcome to the Wordsworth and Romanticism Blog. Here you will find lively and engaging explorations of the literature, history and culture of the Romantic period (1750 to 1850) from a variety of contributors. Illuminating and thought-provoking, they offer fresh perspectives on a period in our cultural history that continues to fascinate and inspire.

Michael McGregor  – The Robert Woof Director of The Wordsworth Trust

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Wordsworthian Romance: 'Into a dazzling cavern'

This post is a shortened version of the Jonathan Wordsworth Memorial Lecture given by Professor Frederick Burwick, at  Grasmere on February 21st 2015.  You can see a film of the whole talk below.

 

In the eighteenth century, the term ‘Romantic’ was applied to a literary resurgence of wild narratives similar to those popular in the aristocratic circles of […]

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William Wordsworth
Wordsworth and Romanticism

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Lord Byron's Dog 'Lyon' (The Wolf Dog) 
by Clifton Tomson. Image courtesy of Newstead AbbeyLord Byron's Dog 'Lyon' (The Wolf Dog) by Clifton Tomson. Image courtesy of Newstead Abbey

Bears, badgers and Boatswain: Lord Byron and his animals

By Tiffany Francis

I remember discussing Byron with my fellow undergrads in the Students’ Union one morning; we were immersed in a module on Romanticism, and had just retired from a lecture on Don Juan. Several coffees later, we had arrived at two conclusions. Firstly, we were desperately in love with him; secondly, we were […]

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William Wordsworth by Henry Eldridge c.1807William Wordsworth by Henry Eldridge c.1806. The Wordsworth Trust.

245 years on, Wordsworth still has much to teach us

By Jonathan Kerr

On the eve of William Wordsworth’s 245th birthday – an occasion celebrated by bibliophiles worldwide each April 7th – some of Britain’s finest contemporary poets are engaged in a project they call The New Lyrical Ballads. This collection pays homage to The Lyrical Ballads (1798), the book of poems Wordsworth co-authored with […]

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The Vampire by Philip Burne-JonesThe Vampire by Philip Burne-Jones

Sex and Death: Vampires from Coleridge to Hammer

By Barry Forshaw

Initially, several Gothic novels were infused with a certain Anglican perspective that (among other things) aligned the sinister influence of the Church of Rome with the locations where Catholicism reigned (notably France, Spain and Italy), concomitantly identified as fertile breeding ground for eldritch evil. A corollary of this was a […]

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Film reviews
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Dunmail RaiseDunmail Raise

Joseph Wilkinson and the Guide to the Lakes

By Jenny Uglow

The Wordsworth Trust has nearly 50 watercolour sketches by Joseph Wilkinson (1765-1831), one of the figures on the fringes of Wordsworth’s life.

When I became interested in him a couple of years ago, for a hugely enjoyable Wordsworth Trust day in Grasmere, celebrating local artists, the Carlisle historian Denis Perriam, thought back […]

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The Wordsworth Trust
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Edmund Burke: studio of Sir Joshua Reynolds Edmund Burke: studio of Sir Joshua Reynolds

Edmund Burke and the Sublime

By Simon Court

The idea of the sublime is central to a Romantic’s perception of, and heightened awareness in, the world. It was Edmund Burke, who in 1757 published a treatise of aesthetics called A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, and therefore provided the English Romantic movement […]

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The intellectual context of Romanticism
Uncategorised

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