Welcome to the Wordsworth and Romanticism Blog. Here you will find lively and engaging explorations of the literature, history and culture of the Romantic period (1750 to 1850) from a variety of contributors. Illuminating and thought-provoking, they offer fresh perspectives on a period in our cultural history that continues to fascinate and inspire.

(c) The Wordsworth Trust; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Wordsworth and old age

by Fred Blick

 

Aging is intrinsic to Wordsworth’s poetry. He declared in 1800, in his Preface to the second edition of Lyrical Ballads, ‘I have said that poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquillity’. Recollection inevitably involves aging. It follows that recollection in general, […]

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William Wordsworth
Wordsworth and Romanticism

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daffodils-ullswater

Re-imagining the Wordsworths: A soundpiece

by Jemima Short

This sound project is the product of collaboration between the Wordsworth Trust and the Northern Bridge Doctoral Training Partnership. A group of PhD Students, led by myself and Kate Sweeney of Newcastle University working alongside Lucy Stone (Newcastle University) and Hannah Piercy (Durham University), set out to create […]

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Dorothy Wordsworth
The work of the Wordsworth Trust
Wordsworth and Romanticism

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Sampson

Book review: In Search of Mary Shelley, by Fiona Sampson

by Barry Forshaw

 

Does Mary Shelley need rescuing from neglect? Has the young woman who created the most iconic figures in Gothic literature apart from Bram Stoker’s Dracula — Frankenstein and his benighted, stitched-together creature — languished in the shadow of her husband and lover Percy Bysshe Shelley, her friend Lord Byron and her […]

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Book reviews
Mary Shelley
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Wordsworth and Romanticism

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Frayling

Book review: Frankenstein: The First Two Hundred Years, by Christopher Frayling

by Barry Forshaw

Given that the 1st of January 2018 is a significant literary date — 200 years since the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein — it is surprising (and disappointing) that this event is not enjoying more ballyhoo – but this sumptuous, over-sized volume goes some way to redressing that injustice.

 

Sir Christopher […]

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Book reviews
Mary Shelley
Wordsworth and Romanticism

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