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Welcome to the Wordsworth and Romanticism Blog. Here you will find lively and engaging explorations of the literature, history and culture of the Romantic period (1750 to 1850) from a variety of contributors. Illuminating and thought-provoking, they offer fresh perspectives on a period in our cultural history that continues to fascinate and inspire.

Michael McGregor, the Robert Woof Director of the Wordsworth Trust

You can get involved on Twitter @Wordsworthians.

27.03.2020

‘Vital Stream’, by Lucy Newlyn

by Adam Neikirk   On the Rock of Names my own initials come Just after William’s, to signify His love for me and quietly confirm A change in the settled order. (“Mary Hutchinson, At Gallow Hill” ln. 1-4, pp. 76)   Vital Stream is a sequence of 135 sonnets, and a new collection of poetry […]

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26.11.2019

‘Keatswatch’ – a natural history game

by Gareth Evans   Let’s play a short game. Imagine you are sitting silently in a darkened room waiting for a small group of early Romantics to enter. First come Dorothy and William Wordsworth. Their footfalls are contrasting in tone, although from the many miles of walking they have undertaken together they are curiously co-ordinated. […]

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03.11.2019

‘Defiant and passionate’: a new production of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

by Andrew Weltch Compared to the film adaptations, stage versions of Frankenstein are surprisingly rare, despite a near-90-year head-start. Or perhaps it’s not surprising: cinema has a much greater appetite for monsters, so our screens have seen Victor’s descendants continuing his work and his creature facing various challenges and enemies in ways even Mary Shelley […]

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23.09.2019

Wordsworth, Coleridge, and the power of perception

by Connor James   While discussing “fluxes… of the mind” in his Preface to the 1802 edition of Lyrical Ballads, Wordsworth draws attention to the mind as a faculty which is subject to constant change. This is evident in the familiar ‘I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,’ which, whether he would have liked it or […]

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09.09.2019

Did Coleridge have Lupus?

by Bethany Askew   Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, SLE or Lupus is a chronic, inflammatory, variable autoimmune disease of connective tissue, typically characterised by skin rash, fatigue, joint and muscle pain and often by disorders of the blood, kidneys, heart, lungs, and brain.   Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772 –1834) was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher […]

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23.08.2019

Five go mad at the Villa Diodati: Ken Russell’s ‘Gothic’

by Andrew Weltch   The creation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is a fascinating tale in its own right. In the summer of 1816, Lord Byron invited fellow poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and his lover, 18-year-old Mary Godwin, to stay at the Villa Diodati near Lake Geneva, along with Mary’s’stepsister Claire Clairmont, and Byron’s physician friend […]

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06.08.2019

An Afternoon with Dorothy Wordsworth

by Hannah Britton On the afternoon of 18th May, Senior Hospice Nurse Lilian Simmonds addressed a group gathered opposite Dove Cottage and asked us to ponder the question: ‘Why should we read Dorothy Wordsworth?’  So began an afternoon that would take us on a journey in Dorothy Wordsworth’s footsteps, walking across a landscape that she […]

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05.08.2019

‘Wild and Majestic’: Romantic visions of Scotland

Oh for the crags that are wild and majestic, The steep frowning glories of dark Lochnagar             Lachin y Gair, Lord Byron, 1807   Lochnagar is a peak in the Grampian Mountains, now part of the Royal Estate of Balmoral. George Gordon Byron was raised in nearby Aberdeen in his […]

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